Unique small food processor

A unique food processing machine which can produce nutritious meals from virtually any raw material at a very low cost will soon be available in SA commercially and for government-backed hunger alleviation projects.
The mechanical acoustic dispenser (MAG) is a single-stage, patented process for manufacturing food emulsions based on raw food m A unique food processing machine which can produce nutritious meals from virtually any raw material at a very low cost will soon be available in SA commercially and for government-backed hunger alleviation projects.
The mechanical acoustic dispenser (MAG) is a single-stage, patented process for manufacturing food emulsions based on raw food materials such as legumes (especially soya beans), cereals, fruits, vegetables and meat. This compares with the present commercial multi-level processes involving variations of grinding, mixing, homogenisation and heat treatment.
Food produced by the MAG, other than meat-based products, has a shelf life of 2-3 weeks at ambient temperatures, without added preservatives.
The technology was developed by the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow and Novosibirsk, Siberia. It has been brought to SA by international businessman Sir Roger Baylis-Duffield, whose Global Energy Solutions Corp (GES) has acquired patent rights in order to develop hunger alleviation models for Africa. The technology is owned jointly by the inventors and GES.
Baylis-Duffield introduced the MAG at the recent 5th International Soyfood Conference in Pretoria and unveiled the equipment’s role in a national feeding and poverty alleviation project involving various SA government ministries and organisations, NGOs, community and humanitarian organisations, the SA Soyfood Assoc and other agriculture-related structures.
MAG processing is done at 95™  °C or lower in a jacketed vessel, which is equipped with a rotor disperser and to which 50% or less water is added. The raw material is processed into uniform nano-sized particles which, together with pasteurisation, achieves extended preservation without addition of chemicals.
The machine has a capacity to process 50 litres per hour and is manufactured to industrial food standards using resilient and approved materials. The food chamber and components are of stainless steel. It runs on electricity. Its robust, easy-to-maintain construction makes it user-friendly in rural conditions.
The MAG can produce up to 6,000 meals per day for a few cents each. A 200g portion of a nutritious maize-soya porridge can be produced for around 6 SAc (0.8 USc), according to Baylis-Duffield. A one-hour manufacturing cycle requires three personnel to convert raw materials into 50kg of food-based emulsion, disperse the food and then return the machine to a clean condition. Research shows that all integral parts of the raw food source remain intact in the finished product.
The technology was originally developed to produce a stable emulsion combining industrial waste oil and water without surfactants – rather like making soap by combining oil and water without any binders or chemicals.
So far, the MAG’s application in food production has been minimal and limited to Siberia. It is now to be fully developed at an SA technikon where GES will install two MAGs in September. There, feeding models, recipes (also for commercial production) and staff training courses will be developed.
Nepad (the New Partnership for African Development) has been approached to co-ordinate the project on behalf of the SA government. The programme makes provision for installing MAGs in hospitals, clinics, schools, etc, as well as establishing market gardens. Roll-out to other southern African states is planned for later in 2004.
Baylis-Duffield says the MAG will be manufactured in SA and will be available commercially by the end of the year. Currently machines are available from Siberia at around E10,000 (R83,000). Local manufacture should bring the price down considerably.
Suitable commercial products include soya milk, jams, soups, ketchup and meat-based products.
Local equipment enquiries should be directed to Pieter Prozesky, chairman of the SA Soyfood Assoc: Tel +27-15-491-7939; pprozesky@mweb.co.za
Baylis-Duffield: rdduff10114@aol.com