Plastic box for delicate products

A manufacturer of plastic goods has come up with a plastic box for packaging fresh produce and other delicate products with many advantages over both the corrugated cardboard carton and the conventional plastic crate.
The world-patented box is stronger and lighter than the cardboard equivalent, can be stacked, promotes fruit ripening, extends A manufacturer of plastic goods has come up with a plastic box for packaging fresh produce and other delicate products with many advantages over both the corrugated cardboard carton and the conventional plastic crate.
The world-patented box is stronger and lighter than the cardboard equivalent, can be stacked, promotes fruit ripening, extends shelf life and its printability is superior to that of carton.
It is also reusable and, according to its designer, fully recyclable.
Its advantages over the crate lie in the fact that the box is lighter, much cheaper to manufacture and collapsible. The main feature of the box is a cheap superstructure combined with weight-bearing corners. The box is folded from a sheet of die cut corrugated polypropylene plastic. The corner uprights, which are specially designed to withstand weight of boxes stacked on top, are clipped into the corners with a manually operated machine. The uprights protrude above the box lid, forming four corners to secure the box stacked above.
Stackability is further enhanced by a polypropylene ring that fits over the corner uprights of adjacent boxes – thus the stack is secured vertically and horizontally.
Farmers who have used the box for packaging fruit, specially bananas and citrus, say fruit ripens faster and shelf life is extended due to reduced moisture loss.
However, the box has also applicability beyond fresh produce packaging. It is useful for packaging a variety for delicate products, such as computers, says the manufacturer.
A box costs around US$0,75, ex factory, depending on size, order size and print requirements.
Users need a machine to assemble the boxes, which are delivered in flat sheets. Once the box is folded into shape, the corner pieces are inserted by a foot-pedal operated machine, which is available from the manufacturers at about $300. It takes about a minute to insert the corner pieces of a box.
The box is made by Crates for Africa, a subsidiary of leading South African manufacturer of plastic goods, Chemcraft.
Crates for Africa: Tel +28 11 968-117; chemcraf@mweb.co.za