Get thee to a wormery

Wormeries are well known in the US, Europe, Australia, New Zealand and elsewhere, where they are being increasingly used to increase waste recycling.
In Africa, wormeries can be used to produce natural fertilizer, saving on expensive artificial fertilizer and radically increasing the fertility of gardens and fields. Artificial fertilizers co Wormeries are well known in the US, Europe, Australia, New Zealand and elsewhere, where they are being increasingly used to increase waste recycling.
In Africa, wormeries can be used to produce natural fertilizer, saving on expensive artificial fertilizer and radically increasing the fertility of gardens and fields. Artificial fertilizers coupled with depletion of the organic material can result in sterile soil.
Earthworms are nature’s way of converting dead waste matter into living matter, thereby enriching the soil with humus and bacteria.
Wizzard Worms of South Africa offers a range of wormeries. A midsized wormery has a 50 litre plastic housing with two small exit holes for the liquid at the bottom and four covered ventilation holes near its top. It is mounted on a metal stand permitting the collection of the liquid fertilizer in a container under the housing. Inside the housing are five feed trays, one above the other and five spacers to keep them apart.
The earthworms eat their way up from one feed tray to the next, as the trays are filled with organic material. The earthworms climb through the holes provided in those feed trays.
When most of the worms are in the top two feed trays, all five trays are removed and the top two, with their worms (with the organic waste they are consuming at that time), then replace the bottom two trays.
The concentrated casts harvested from the remaining three trays is top dressing for establishing plants, etc. But, says Don Blacklaw, owner of Wizzard Worms, the fluid is the most vital product of the wormeries. A 50 litre wormery can produce about four litres per month.
Wizzard Worms offers a basic small wormery, the 50 litre domestic kitchen waste wormery (which handles the organic waste of a household of four), a nursery unit (with 200 litre units), and larger industrial units. The 50 litre unit, for instance, costs about $75 including starter worms. The worms used are what Blacklaw calls “industrial” (and industrious), and are different to normal garden worms. Blacklaw says that Australia and New Zealand are the most advanced countries in the use of wormeries. For instance, all the organic waste produced in the 2000 Olympics Village in Australia was processed through wormeries, he says.
Full instructions are given with all units supplied.
Wizzard Worms: tel +27-33-413 1837 or +27-72-102-1636; donblacklaw@greytown.co.za
www.wizzardworms.co.za