Biodiesel from coconuts

West-African countries desperate to alleviate their fuel shortages and bolster their ailing power supplies, have set sight on South African made biodiesel producing plants to convert coconut oil into diesel for use in power generators.
A delegation comprising government officials from Senegal, Gabon and Guinea-Bissau is negotiating with rep West-African countries desperate to alleviate their fuel shortages and bolster their ailing power supplies, have set sight on South African made biodiesel producing plants to convert coconut oil into diesel for use in power generators.
A delegation comprising government officials from Senegal, Gabon and Guinea-Bissau is negotiating with representatives of an engineering company that offers large as well as small to medium sized production lines to produce biodiesel from oilseeds such as sunflower, maize, cotton, avocado, peanut, palm and canola.
Also available from the company is a competitively priced tractor and a farming system, which, when combined with the tractor and a small-scale biodiesel production unit, can turn subsistence farmers into agri-processors.
The West Africans are interested in large plants with capacities of producing five to six million litres of biodiesel per month, using as raw material their vast resources of naturally occurring coconuts.
A diesel conversion plant of that size can be built at approximately $500,000, says Mike Lynott, spokesman for Marlim, the manufacturers of the equipment. If oil extraction facilities are required as well, Marlim would supply Belgium made plants capable of producing 200,000 l/day. These cost around $6m per unit.
A production line for small and medium sized businesses with a capacity to produce 5,000 litres of biodiesel per 24 hour day from oilseeds is available at about $140,000 (about $90,000 for the cold press plant and $50,000 for the diesel conversion unit).
The farming system, called Microfarms, aims at teaching people to become subsistence farmers producing vegetables and poultry products to feed their families. Where farmers are able to produce more than their immediate needs, they can form units collectively using a tractor and/or supplying a biodiesel producing plant.
The 30H.P. tractor costs about $10,000. There is a choice of 23 possible detachments, including a maize mill, vegetable oil press and a special land mine detonator (for use in Angola and Mozambique).
Marlim is seeking suitable partners to manufacture the tractors in Africa, outside its southern African distribution range.
Marlim: Tel 057 3573164; mikel@marlim.co.za TO E-MAIL THE SUPPLIER, CLICK BELOW