SEPT-OCTOBER ISSUE: READ IT NOW

fpa-sep-coverClick here to read/download the issue (pdf file)

HIGHLIGHTS:
Free Trade: Africa finally gets serious
The past few months have seen some significant developments for African trade and integration. These advances come at a crucial time for the continent.

South Africa’s sugar tax war
There’s a bitter battle going between the state and the beverage sector in South Africa over a proposed sugar tax. We ask whether an industry that is one of the very few showing any growth at all should be choked by a tax whose desired public health benefit is disputed.

Meat needs much more monitoring
Ineffective meat inspection in developing countries is causing a rise in antibiotic-resistant superbugs, heavy metal contamination and foodborne-disease. Research in Africa shows governments need to wake up to their responsibility to ensure that meat quality is more closely monitored.

The PET bottle boom
Over the past six years bottled water growth in West Africa has doubled to 40-billion litres a year – providing a massive boost to the PET industry. No surprise then that PET equipment specialists like Sidel are making an aggressive play in the West African market. You’ll find them and host of other packaging suppliers at Propak West Africa in Lagos this month.



JULY-AUG ISSUE NOW AVAILABLE

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Click here to read/download (it’s a PDF file you can read offline).

HIGHLIGHTS:

Coke bets big in Africa
With a brand-new $130-million bottling plant just opened in Mozambique, the beverage giant sees sweet opportunity for further growth in the region.

The paper-bag revolution
Moving packaged dry goods in paper bags has always been risky because of leakage and contamination issues. Now Bosch has come up with a revolutionary paper-bag solution to tackle these challenges.

It’s GO for GMO-free milling
South Africa’s neighbours don’t want its GMO-maize. So one South African company has seized the opportunity and is opening the country’s first dedicated GMO-free maize milling operation.

A show for Africa, by Africa
The upcoming food & drink technology Africa show in Johannesburg brings together key players in the African food and beverage sector. It’s a must-visit for the industry.

Make farming glamorous
Nigeria’s former president Olusegun Obasanjo has made an impassioned plea to get young Africans back to the land and dispel the myth that farming is a dead-end road to poverty. Meanwhile, the African Development Bank has a multi-billion dollar investment strategy to transform agriculture.

Fingers on the Pulse
2016 is The Year of the Pulse and we look at the importance of this key food group for addressing food security issues on the continent.

Think big with small fish
Wild fish found in in Africa’s drylands could play a vital role in meeting nutrition needs, says the FAO. We look deeper at the issue.



LET’S GET CREATIVE ABOUT FOOD FOR AFRICA

Our May-June issue is now available. Click on the cover to read (it’s a PDF file you can download and read offline).fpa-june-cover

HIGHLIGHTS OF THIS ISSUE:

FOODS OF THE FUTURE

The challenges of drought, global warming and growing populations demand creative solutions to putting food on the table.  In this issue we explore innovative approaches to protein supply – artificial meat and home-harvesting of insects. Meet the people who are thinking outside the box.
`
AFRICA BECKONS  …

Packaging/processing  giants Dow and Bosch are committed to African growth strategies as the continent’s population becomes more urban, more middle class and increasingly hungry for packaged foods. Find out what their plans are.



Our March-April issue is out. Read it online

fpa march-aprilThe March-April 2016 issue of Food Processing Africa is now available.

Click on the cover to read it (PDF file which you can also save to your hard drive).

This month’s issue takes a hard look at African food security issues, exploring topics such as:

* Why obesity and hunger go hand in hand.

* How hungry cities are becoming dependent on the informal food sector.

* Why high-tech hydroponics and urban farming could be the solution to food insecurity.

* How 3 African universities are teaming up to tackle the challenges of food security.

We also look at a small farmer export success story in the northern Cape of SA involving rooibos tea.



2016 Supplier Directory now available

fbd2016coverThe South African 2016 Supplier Directory for the foodbev sector is now available online.

Click here to read it . It’s 2.5 Mb PDF file. You can save it to your hard drive for instant access next time you’re looking for a supplier. The online version is searchable using Adobe Reader or similar software.

The 40-page 2016 directory has been completely updated and covers the full range of suppliers to the food and beverage sector, with hundreds of contacts in over 50 categories. Although It focuses on the South African market, many of those listed already have sales channels into Africa or are eager to expand.

The directory is produced by Food & Beverage Reporter, the sister publication of Food Processing Africa.



Our Jan-Feb 2016 issue is online

Click on the cover to read it.

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The wrath of El Niño grips Africa

Poor rains as a result of the continued wrath of El Niño weather pattern have put much strain on the SADC region farming sector. Drought cut the staple maize crop in South Africa, Africa’s biggest producer, by about a third of the 2015/2016 season and is likely to continue into the southern hemisphere summer as El Niño strengthens According to a statement from the Crop Estimates Committee,
farmers in South Africa will reduce 2016 season plantings of the grain to the smallest since 2011 because of poor rains in the main growing regions. The El Niño effect is a known phenomenon which causes the sea temperature to rise significantly in the Pacific Ocean off South America, and the air becomes dry, affecting the rain-formation process.
Difficulties
United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) and the World Food Programme (WFP) has indicated that a combination of failed harvests in a number of SADC countries during the 2014/2015 summer together with the effects of ongoing drought conditions in the region would create an estimated 27,4 million food-insecure people over the next six months.
Said the statement: “Most at threat from immediate food insecurity are Malawi, Zimbabwe and Madagascar which all suffered severe crop failure due to extended dry spells. There are also concerns about growing food insecurity in Lesotho and the southern parts of Angola and Mozambique. While Botswana and Namibia also suffered from extensive drought earlier this year, people in these countries are not considered as much at risk.”
Furthermore the statement added that Malawi was struggling with its worst food insecurity in a decade as a result of damage-causing floods that had then been followed by the current drought conditions. Zimbabwe’s harvest from its 2014/2015 summer crops was reported to be 50% down from the 2013/14 summer production season.
For the South Africa’s maize belt the weather patterns has brought more drought to already-parched regions.
In West Africa, a lack of rainfall across Ghana’s cocoa belt has raised fears that the world’s No. 2 grower could be facing another poor crop. In Ethiopia, 4.5 million people need food aid because of El Nino and long-term climate change.
SADC Climate Service Centre Regional Coordinator Bradwell Garanganga said much of SADC is likely to receive normal to below-normal rainfall for the periods October to December 2015 as well as January to March 2016, adding that “a persistent strong El Niño is also favoured during the bulk of the rainfall season.”
Solutions
Garanganga furthermore said that the SADC region should be prepared for such natural phenomena. “For example, farmers could plant crops that do not take long to mature, and the region should invest more infrastructure development including roads, irrigation and silos.”
In South Africa, the provincial agricultural departments of Free State, Limpopo, Mpumalanga, North West
and KwaZulu-Natal have provided R14,7 million in drought relief assistance to small-scale and subsistence farmers in the provinces. The five provinces are reported to currently be the worst affected by the drought. The funds will be used for animal feed and water and for intensifying awareness campaigns.
The provincial agricultural departments submitted their declaration requests to the Provincial Disaster Management Centers in accordance with the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002).
The drought disaster stricken provinces will submit their disaster funding requests to the South African
National Treasury through the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC).
In the meantime, the department said that it has approached the Industrial Development Corporation and the Land Bank for possible assistance. Both indicated that they have plans to assist affected farmers. The plans include providing soft loans.
The Zimbabwean government has, as a result of the ongoing drought, slashed the 2015 growth forecast to 1.5% from 3.2%. Aid agencies say 1.5 million Zimbabweans, or 16% of the population, would need food aid by next March.
Meanwhile in Uganda, there is an increased disaster management focus around the country as it expects heavy rainfall during the months of January and February 2016. Heavy rains have already led to a rise in cholera cases. The disease has killed at least six people in western Uganda.
Additional reporting from: Reuters, Farmers weekly, News24



Helping the world prosper one cup at a time

Heard the one about the bank that built a coffee shop? And then gave away the coffee for free? No, probably not, because that’s never been done before.
But now, incorporating a personal interactive experience has become one of the leading drivers in consumer behaviour. And Absa bank, a member of the Barclays group, has launched a one-of-a-kind in-bank pop up coffee shop, Prosper Café, as an extension of its Prosper campaign, which encourages consumers
to ‘prosper’ in all that they doIn a move that “pushes the boundaries of its brand-consumer engagement
and transcends the limits of traditional creative communication”, Prosper Café offers consumers an “engaging brand experience”.
The idea
Lauren Daniel, brand manager, marketing and corporate, explains the thought process chain behind the shops: “We want to engage our clients in a different way, moving away from product push marketing and personalising the experience. We have been working with our creative agency, The Jupiter Drawing Room, for the past year to conceptualise an activation experience that would support our Prosper campaign. We
wanted to create an activation that could be used across the bank, that would reinforce the Prosper promise and that would activate all the senses, not just the visual and auditory senses stimulated through traditional media. Not only does Prosper Café meet all these requirements, but as a scalable, mobile pop-up store that comes in a kit format, it’s economical too. Prosper Café is undoubtedly one of
our most exciting marketing activations in recent years at Absa.”
She says, Prosper Café integrates all Absa’s marketing activations and promotions, furthers its Prosper
messaging, fluidly crosses multipleaudiences, and can be used by all Absa business units as needed, “ensuring a consistent and engaging brand experience, every time”.
Coffee
According to Dana Cullinan, creative director at The Jupiter Drawing Room, the creative team was very specific in its choice of coffee as a medium. “Coffee has been bringing people together for centuries, and activating all five senses for just as long. Prosper Café gave us an opportunity to pair this with a space that offered multiple communication contact points. It was an idea that allowed us to connect brand and consumer in a unique, authentic and refreshingly unexpected way.”
The premium coffees and red espressos and cappuccinos served at the coffee shops are exclusively blended for the café from sustainably-sourced 100% arabica beans. “These beans are sourced from Honduras, Colombia, Burundi and Uganda, and the tea from local rooibos farms, reflecting the global, African and
South African footprint of the Barclays brand,” says Daniel
Furthermore, as an extension of the Prosper philosophy, “which hinges around stimulating and facilitating the hopes and dreams of ordinary people… Prosper has been incorporated through the coffee
beans which are sourced from companies employing transparent, fair trade policies such as the Rainforest Alliance to the product collateral messaging on coffee cups, stirrers, sugar sachets and complementary chocolates. In displaying infographic narratives of the stories of the organisations and people we have chosen to work with – including Coffee Kids and The Long Mile Coffee Project – on the most prominent piece of coffee shop real estate, the store counter.”
Both Coffee Kids and The Long Mile Coffee Project work to conserve biodiversity and ensure sustainable
livelihoods by transforming landuse practices, business practices and consumer behaviour.
Implementation
The pop-up café will also be used at Absa sponsored events, such as the Absa Cape Epic, KKNK and L’Atelier, offering what is essentially Prosper coffee (a premium ground coffee especially blended for the bank). The coffees will be brewed and served under the leadership of renowned South African coffee personality Alessandro Morrico. Trained in Italy, Morrico is one of only four South African, World Barista Championship-certified judges and the only South African to obtain an acclaimed SCAE Coffee Diploma from the Speciality Coffee Association of Europe. This is a diploma that is made up of over six different diplomas achieved over five years.
Says Daniel: “Absa is a brand that prides itself on being innovative and driven by the belief that everything we do should serve a purpose. This is a one-of-a-kind concept and we are extremely optimistic that the idea will be implemented throughout our consumer base.”
Barclays Africa’s registered head office is in Johannesburg, South Africa, and it has majority stakes in banks in Botswana, Ghana, Kenya, Mauritius, Mozambique, Seychelles, South Africa, Tanzania (Barclays Bank Tanzania and National Bank of Commerce), Uganda and Zambia. It also has representative offices in Namibia and Nigeria. Barclays Bank PLC has operations in Egypt and Zimbabwe which are an integral part of Barclays Africa’s African business and continue to be run by Barclays Africa operationally.
Barclays Africa Tel: +27 011 350 4000; www.home.barclays.com

And in international news …
Capital One Financial Corp‘s new Boston office opened recently, with no tellers. The firm is expanding a “cafe” format in which visitors can get gourmet coffee and free Wi-Fi but can’t sit with a banker who will open an account for them or drop off a loan application.Instead, employees steer customers to its website and answer questions about the bank’s services. As it has in other locations, the company will also probably host occasional alcohol free “appy hours” that promote the smartphone apps of local businesses.
Capital One sees the cafe format, which it is using at several locations around the US, as a way to promote the bank’s brand without employing large numbers of tellers.
– The Wall Street Journal, Is This a Coffee Shop or a Bank?



Building an innovative wendy house

We explore how a Johannesburg man went about sourcing and selecting recycled materials to sustain the wooden home he built
Gaetano Gesualdo, a 65-year-old Italian expatriate tool and die maker, has been residing in South Africa for about 20 years. He has several years of experience in creating and building practical items. We take a look at his latest creation – a wooden structure consisting of a room, a bathroom and a kitchen which was built using “scrap” material.
Gesualdo started building his “wendy house” which has two separate entrances, using pallet wood late in 2013.
“It began with my decision to find a suitable shed to store my tools in. I priced around and after establishing that it would cost me from R30, 000 to R75, 000 ($2110.05to $ 5275.12) for the wendy house I wanted I decided to build one myself.”
Gesualdo says there was no rush to complete the project, which evolved from the initial intention of being a tool shed, to currently housing a worker on the property he owns in Nigel. Nigel is a small former gold mining town in the Gauteng Province situated on the edge of the greater Johannesburg area, known as the East Rand.
The exterior
Gesulado collected pallets until he had sufficient to begin constructing the wendy house.
“I used approximately 6,000 pieces of pallet wood. I used a plane to smooth down each plank after they were individually removed from their pallets using a crowbar.”
After all the planks had been smoothed out, which took about a month, they were stacked up and stored in
Gesualdo’s yard.
“My son, a worker and myself started by removing 30cm of sand around the area which we decided to build the foundation on. We dug up an area 10 metres in length and 5metres in width. The concrete was poured in and left to dry.”
A total of 30 bags of cement, 15m2 of sand and 10m2 stone was mixed to create the basis for the wooden structure to be built on. Thereafter three layers of bricks (about 200) were laid on the concrete base.
Gesulado says more than 50 pieces of 40×100 pine wood were used as the frame of the wooden home.
“These were placed vertically across. The pallets were secured horizontally using screws to nail individual pieces of pallet against the vertical pine pieces. There was space left for the window frames. The complete wooden house has four windows in the front section and two on each of the sides.”
Gesualdo says an estimated 450 nails were used to secure all planks, to complete the wooden structure. The door frames and doors were constructed using a generous amount of the pallet wood planks.
The roof trusses were built and secured with metal gussets. “Four roof trusses were placed on both the right and left side of the wooden structure. A total of eight were placed inside. This was done to secure the home, so that it will not collapse,” Gesulado comments.
Roof space had been left open to attach a clear corrugated roof sheet on a small section of the roof. “This is the skylight for my wendy house. This idea allows more light to penetrate through, so it is not dark inside.”
The corrugated sheet was attached with a corrugated fastener- a special type of nail used on such materials.
The interior
Gesualdo used 15m2 ceramic tiles in the interior of the wendy house. “I searched for a tile supplier of redundant tiles. The tiles I chose were not tainted or damaged in any way, they were quality tiles. The supplier had one box in stock. I inquired which tiles only consisted of a box, made a reasonable offer and got two different styles of tiles.”
The bathroom consists of a shower and toilet. “Being an innovative person, I recycled an old dirt-bin and
used this as the toilet’s cistern. It was perfect as it is a 25 litre capacity bin. I drilled a hole through on the right hand side of the bin and connected a pipe.”
Gesulado also built an outside lavatory, using a cooler box as the cistern and had that connected the same as the inside toilet cistern. “I called in a plumber and an electrician to do the electrical
and plumbing work required.”
Kitchen units were built using solid wood purchased at a hardware store. Gesualdo maintains that his “hand-built” wooden home will last for several years without weathering affects. “There were five coats of wood varnish mixed with thinners painted on. It was diluted with thinners so the liquid would seep
through the wood, providing a solid layer of protection.”
It took Gesulado seven months to complete the wendy house.
Uses of Wendy Houses
• Tool sheds: It can be used to store mechanical, electrical and other tools.
• Dog kennels: These houses are a perfect choice to home your pets.
• Play houses: You can have your kids play with their dolls, relax or just have fun in a wendy house.
• Staff quarters: They are suitable for temporary or permanent staff accommodation, especially for moderately-sized businesses.
• Guard huts or offices: If you have a guard in your home, you can accommodate them in this house.
This is a lower cost accommodation solution for your guard. However, some people choose to have workstations in their gardens. This provides a place where you can concentrate on work, away from
interruptions.



New infusion steam system revolutionises processes

Zambia-based beverage manufacture, Dairy Gold, a subsidiary of Trade Kings, recently launched a new system to hydrate maize flour for the manufacture of drinks. Commissioned for OAL Group, the new OAL Steam Infusion system is said to give the manufacturer a competitive advantage while reducing operating
costs and improving product quality.Trade Kings Limited is a prominent FMCG manufacturer in Zambia and
one of the major manufacturers in the region. Having sold its drinks business to SABMiller in 2009, Dairy
Gold wished to re-enter the market in 2015 with a new beverage offering. It decided to launch a new brand of highly nutritious maize based drink, called Ama Sipsip.
Winani Chiwowa, manufacturing director at Trade Kings, says the company was looking to re-enter the market with a maheu product as well as a variety of other ambient drinks: “Our company was seriously considering re-entering the market but needed to do this with products and processes which were superior to our competitors as well as being cost effective in this very demanding market place.”
Chiwowa says Dairy Gold has a good understanding of traditional processing technologies and was in search of new technologies to provide the competitive advantages for their new venture. “Reentering
the market, we believed there was a big opportunity to dramatically reduce operating costs and improve
product quality. Following many tests,we decided on the OAL Steam Infusion Vaction technology system from
OAL Group, a United Kingdom based company.”
Steam Infusion is a low risk cooking process that heats, mixes and cooks liquid based food products fast and efficiently.
Jake Norman, sales and marketing manager at OAL Group, says the system can manufacture 15,000 litres of maheu an hour, using only one 5,000 litre vessel to hydrate maize flour. He says: “OAL Group designed, built and commissioned Dairy Gold’s new hydration system in Zambia. Using patented Vaction™ technology, the steam infusion system can hydrate maize flour up to concentrations of 12%, at a rate of 15,000 litres per hour using only one 5,000 litre vessel. The maize slurry produced is then fermented at 60˚C for two hours before continuously passing through two steam infusion Vaction units to heat the final product to 90˚C, before filling.
“The first stage compromises a large batch vessel with recirculation routes and a powder entrainment system. This system is designed to batch liquid ingredients, entrain 500kg of powders into a five tonne batches, and heat it up to 80°C in 20 minutes. The recirculation routes consist of two Vaction units in parallel that allow for in-line heating and routing of the product to the next stage of processing. The second phase takes the product from the fermentation stage and brings it to temperature before final processing and packaging. This stage is completed using a continuous production system via two Vaction units in series. The control system can vary operating conditions of the steam infusion technology to provide a consistent product output temperature.”
Norman says the steam infusion realises significant business benefits: “Steam Infusion does not expose product to excess temperatures because of the partial vacuum generated in the Vaction unit, improving product quality by eliminating burn on contamination. There are also no moving parts, making the process inherently easy to clean and maintain.”
Flexible manufacturing
Due to consumers’ changing preferences, products that are both smooth and gritty need to be manufactured using the same equipment. By altering the steam flow rate through the Vaction unit, the level of shear can be increased and decreased, allowing manufacturers to change the characteristics of the final product.
Concludes Chiwowa: “The installed system is simpler with fewer stages compared to traditional methods. Previously a maize slurry was premixed by hand before heating in a vessel with a steam jacket or a steam coil. The new steam infusion system instantly hydrates maize flour on a single recirculation system. Dairy Gold has also benefited from energy savings and lower maize processing costs due to a significant reduction in capital equipment and energy efficiency. The ability to increase our maize concentration means we can create a higher quality product.”
OAL Group: Tel +44 1733 394 700; sales@oalgroup.com; www.oalgroup.com
Trade Kings Zambia: Tel +260 211 286 117 /27; info@tradekings.co.zm; www.tradekingszambia.com



Unilever opens first African ice-cream factory

Unilever South Africa has opened the doors of its first state-of-the-art ice cream factory in Africa, in Lords View Industrial Park, Midrand, Johannesburg. The factory is one of 40 Unilever ice cream factories internationally, and sets new standards in green and low-cost manufacturing.
Speaking at the opening of the Lords View ice cream factory, Bruno Witvoet, Unilever’s Executive Vice President for Africa, said the multinational is very positive about the rising demand in the ice cream category: “ Unilever is optimistic about growth in demand in the ice cream category, and has invested approximately R600 million in this new factory. With this investment we are well positioned to meet future demand. It will offer sufficient capacity for the current sales volume to double while also servicing increased demand for brands like Magnum, Cornetto, GinoGinelli, Paddelpop, Frutarre and Rich ‘n
Creamy. The factory will furthermore help Unilever to continue on its journey of decoupling its growth from environmental impact while increasing positive social impact. Furthermore it will contribute towards reaching the ambitious targets set in the Unilever Sustainable Living Plan.”
Witvoet said Unilever has proven its confidence in South Africa’s and Africa’s growth potential by investing a total of R4 billion in new and refurbished manufacturing facilities in South Africa.
The factory
The factory is fitted with green technology from TetraPak for the processing machinery which handles the ice-cream mix preparation, extrusion tunnel lines (which run at an estimated 200 units per minute), moulding, filling and (specific to the Magnum brand) a Tetra Pak® Chocolate Enrober.
Cape Town-based packaging systems company AcePak supplied and installed the automatic case packer; H.G Molenaar, a large machinery producer provided the weighers.
Illovo sugar, Eurosticks and Raveninn packaging are Unilever’s choice of suppliers for raw sugar, sticks and packaging boxes respectively.
The ice cream factory utilises smart green technology to harvest rain water. The water is recovered and reused in the production processes.
The factory will also apply a zerowaste-to-landfill policy and features energy efficient technology. “The
refrigeration from local manufacturer Ecolab (Pty) Ltd, along with other utilities services, are specifically designed to reduce energy consumed through efficient motors, drive mixers and air compressors,” said Sandeep Desai, Unilever South Africa’s Vice President of Manufacturing. “This, combined with decreased water usage and responsible waste disposal, has an exponentially positive effect on the factory’s environmental impact.”Lords View Industrial Park was specifically chosen as the preferred site due to its Environmental Impact Statement which resonates with Unilever’s Environmental Management Plan and its focus on sustainability.
Development
Unilever partnered with Harambe Human Resource Consulting to recruit employees for the factory from communities that surround Lord’s View Industrial Park.
Explains Desai: “So far 150 new jobs have been created since the start of the factory, and another 200 indirect jobs.
Unilever aims to create a further 2,500 jobs by the end of 2015 through its Ola Vendor Programme. The programme empowers micro-entrepreneurs from previously disadvantaged backgrounds by giving them the equipment needed to start an ice-cream vending business.
It offers continuous development and support opportunities, helping these entrepreneurs to be successful
business people.”
Minister of Trade and Industry, Rob Davies, acknowledged Unilever’s continued investment in the country. He said the company actively collaborated with the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) to ensure that its investments were preserved within an enabling environment. The DTI has given incentives of nearly R1.981 billion related to Unilever’s investments since 2011, he said. Additionally, the DTI has supported
the new factory through its 12i Tax Allowance Incentive scheme. The scheme supports greenfield Investments (new industrial projects that have only new and unused manufacturing assets) and projects that are environmentally system sustainable.
Said Davies: “South Africa needs growth and development to sustain its population. Our natural resources,
on the other hand, need to be handled carefully to sustain the planet. If these two requirements can be balanced, as they have been at this ice cream factory, a brighter future certainly is within our reach.”
AcePak: Tel +27 11 393 1110; www.acepak.co.za
Ecolab: Tel +27 11 578 5000; ecolabafricareception@ecolab.com; www.ecolab.com
H.G Molenaar: Tel +27 21 868 2210; info@hgmolenaar.com; www.hgmolenaar.com
TetraPak: Tel +27 11 570 3000; www.tetrapak.com/za
The Department of Trade and Industry: Tel +27 12 394 9500; www.thedti.gov.za
Unilever South Africa: Tel + 27 860 330 006; Barry.Dijoe@unilever.com; www.unilever.co.za



SA’s first energy from effluent in anaerobic waste water treatment facility

Over the past four years Distell has been developing a “green plan” to install a common anaerobic
water treatment facility in the Stellenbosch area, Western Cape.
The facility is expected to lower the chemical oxygen demand (COD) load in the outfall to the municipality, harvest the energy in the waste water, and lower the overall cost of effluent treatment.
The Veolia Biobulk® Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR)
The contract to design, build and operate SA’s first Biobulk® waste water treatment facility was awarded to Veolia Water Technologies SA. Veolia uses innovative technology and specialised skills to achieve water sustainability for people and industries.
The Distell-owned plant will be ready for commissioning in March 2016.Distell has three operational sites in the Stellenbosch: Adam Tas, Van Ryn and Bergkelder.
The Biobulk CSTR technology is a robust and proven process which treats industrial effluents with significantly high amounts of suspended solids.It is the anaerobic equivalent of the conventional activated sludge digestion system. Blended solid or liquid waste streams enter the reactor and are treated by anaerobic suspended bacteria. The majority of the soluble or solid COD is converted into biogas, significantly reducing the solids concentration in the waste stream. After a retention time of
several days, the treated waste stream leaves the reactor.
The Biobulk can be operated as a once-through system. Alternatively, biomass can be returned after a
clarification stage. The key to the Biobulk design is the manner in which the reactor vessel is mixed and the design of the degassing stage prior to clarification.
Produced biogas is temporarily collected in the headspace of the Biobulk CSTR, which acts as a biogas holder.
Biogas can be used as a source of renewable energy or burned in a biogas flare.
Technology features:
• Tolerance for high concentrations of TSS, fats, oil and grease (FOGs).
• Medium volumetric loading capacity (2-5kg COD/m3/day).
• Energy source from biogas production.
• Economical operation.
• Proven reliability.
The technical manager at Veolia Water Technologies SA, Jaco Oosthuizen, says the system represents a long term capital saving.
“It brings with it an operating cost saving in that solids in the effluent no longer need not be removed. They can be converted to biogas (energy) in the reactor.”
The Biothane Biobulk® Anaerobic Digester is the heart of the plant. “Ancillary equipment includes storage
buffer tanks, clarifiers, the centrifuge, boiler and biogas flare. First, the digester reduces the effluent COD content by 94.1%. Next, a clarifier removes suspended solids, in turn followed by Veolia Hydrotech drum filtering for tertiary treatment. This ensures the total suspended solid (TSS) concentration is less than 150mg/l.”
On commissioning of the facility, a 10-year Build, Operate, and Transfer (BOT)agreement comes into force.
“The 10-year BOT contract will enable Veolia full ownership of the plant’s functions for the agreed period. This will ensure an appropriate transition from Veolia’s commissioning teams to its operations team,” says Oosthuizen.
Veolia’s Operations and Maintenance division in the Western Cape will perform all operations and maintenance functions for 10 years.
Veolia is mandated to deliver:
• The specified quality of water;
• Carry out ongoing maintenance;
• Ensure the plant’s operating performance is in accordance with set objectives.
Treatment
Veolia will treat 1,000m³ of effluent with an organic load of 8.6 tons COD per day. The water that is treated will be discharged to the municipal wastewater works.
The final effluent discharged to the municipality will contain less than 500kg COD per day and the suspended solids concentration will be less than 150mg/l.
Veolia’s operation and maintenance personnel as well as engineers from Biothane in the Netherlands will form part of the commissioning team. The operational personnel will be trained,via on-the-job coaching and theoretical training modules, to take over full plant responsibility.
Veolia Water Technologies South Africa:
Tel+27-11-663-3608; www.veoliawaterst.co.za

There are 2 major types of systems used for wastewater treatment
They are aerobic and anaerobic systems. This particular piece focuses on anaerobic treatment.
Anaerobic treatment is a process where wastewater or material is broken down by microorganisms without
the aid of dissolved oxygen. However, anaerobic bacteria can and will use oxygen that is found in the oxides introduced into the system or they can obtain it from organic material within the wastewater. Anaerobic systems are used in many industrial systems including food production and municipal sewage treatment systems.
Anaerobic digestion is commonly used to treat sludges in the first areas of a wastewater treatment plant. This process is popular because it is able to stabilize the water with little biomass production.
Anaerobic treatment occurs in many different stages. The key microorganisms are methane formers and acid formers.The acid formers are microorganisms that create various acids from the sludge.
Methane formers convert the acids into methane.
The two main anaerobic systems are batch systems and continuous systems. In a batch system, the biomass
is added into a reactor that is sealed for the rest of the digestion process. This is the simplest form of anaerobic treatment but can have odor issues associated with it. As the most simple, it is also one of
the least expensive ways to achieve treatment.
A continuous system has organic matter constantly added to the treatment system. Since it is continuously being fed, there is a need for the byproduct to continuously be removed. The byproduct can result in a constant source of biogas, which can be used as an alternative source for energy. This system is usually more expensive to operate because of the need for constant monitoring and manpower.
Whether it is aerobic or anaerobic treatment, each treatment system has its place in the world today.
They are very different in the process but both are used to achieve maximum degradation, while meeting
the strict regulations set by the environmental agencies that regulate what is released into the air, ground, or water.
www.ebsbiowizard.com



Little Green Beverages goes green

As sustainability makes waves in the corporate world, members of the food and beverage industry have begun to follow suit and take the necessary steps to go green. Little Green Beverages (LBG), manufacturers of the carbonated drink line Refreshhh brand, recently did an overhaul of their Isando factory in Johannesburg, in a bid to become completely eco-efficient
Reduce
Speaking to director Lyle Batchelor, the concept of being eco-efficient has always been on the cards for the manufacturer, it was merely a matter of the right time: “Our main focus for the company was to do the right thing with regards to our overall carbon footprint. In so doing, we were faced with the task of looking at our whole supply chain and seeing where we were able to reduce our carbon footprint. We
started with collaborations with our suppliers, encouraging partnerships that support our sustainability stance and furthermore exploring partnerships that will in turn be mutually beneficial.” LGB furthermore reduced part of their carbon emissions by purchasing a number of new delivery trucks which boast light
weight bodies.
Recycle
According to Batchelor, LGB found a perfect partner in Extrupet Group (Pty)Ltd, a modern recycling operation, dedicated to the recycling of post-consumer polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles company also based in Johannesburg. Joint managing director at Extrupet, Chandru Wadhwani explains that it is a phenomenal step LGB is taking, “The volume of waste generated was growing faster than the recycling habits in South Africa. On the other hand our landfills are also inadequate and not entirely safe. The ability to recycle post-consumer bottles back into new PET bottles will help ensure the long-term viability of PET plastics recycling in South Africa. The resin will be used in new carbonated soft drink bottles for LGB.”
LGB partnered with a preform manufacture who uses a percentage R-Pet produced by Extrupet in a newly
designed preform for LGB. The preform is reheated in the green oven which is made out of ceramic heaters using less energy. The blower will then work at a lesser pressure resulting in further energy efficiency. This is truly a first of its kind in carbonated drinks; the goal has always been to move from just bottling water to carbonated soft drink with PhoenixPET.
Re-use
Wadhwani explains further: “PhoenixPET has the capability to provide a level of quality assurance to meet the growing local and regional demand in the bottle and thermoforming industry (the food, beverage and packaging market) for environmentally friendly and sustainable packaging. PhoenixPET is to be viewed
as a bench-mark for other recycled polymers as well as packaging mediums aspiring to attain a cradle-to-cradle solution for sustainable packaging.
Convertors and brand owners can now strengthen their corporate image with a sustainable message in all their products. By using food grade recycled PET, the demand for virgin material is decreased, less energy is used and a huge reduction in net carbon emissions achieved.
Both Batchelor and Wadhwani agree that the aseptic system machinery provided by Italian company SIPA, has
allowed for this revolutionary process to occur without passing the expenditure to consumers and retailers. Says Batchelor, “The investment from LGB, in the form of this highly technologically advanced
equipment, as costly as it was will not directly impact consumers via price changes. As it is a well-known fact,recycled material does cost more but the investment was never driven by returns but rather by carbon costing.”
So committed is LBG to reducing its carbon footprint that in the near future it will be upgrading the existing line to meet the standard of the new aseptic line along with inserting a new reverse osmosis water plant that will enable them to use recycled water for in-house use prior to dumping.
Little Green Beverages: Tel 011-865-2598;
info@refreshhh.co.za; www.refreshhh.co.za

PhoenixPET plant in Wadeville, Johannesburg was recently relaunched and now includes a state of the art Bottle-2-Bottle recycling plant furnished with Starlinger recycling technology, specially engineered to
fulfil the expectations and standards needed for bottles for carbonatedsoft drink, bottled water and all other forms of PET packaging. The whole expansion is worth R75-million. The plant is ISO 9001:2008 accredited and we use what we call NIR (near infrared) auto sort technology which is a first on the
continent. The system is such that the plastic bottles are automatically sorted by polymer types



SAAFoST addresses food science

SAAFoST, the South African Association for Food Science and Technology, held its 21st Biennial
international congress and exhibition on the 7th to 9th September 2015 in Durban, Kwa-Zulu Natal
hosting a multitude of global food and beverage scientists.
Opening the three day event, current SAAFoST President Ryan Ponquette highlighted the theme,Growing Food Science and Technology for a sustainable future, as a very important one especially for a developing country like South Africa as much work is still to be done with regards to food technology.
Said Ponquette: “ This congress promises the best and latest from the South African food industry – from technology and trends, academic research and new ingredients to world class exhibition stands, all contributing to a lovely networking and innovation space.”
Ponquette also spoke of the launch of MySAAFoST, a cyber forum where young scientists, students and technologists are encouraged to share their ideas and knowledge. Chairperson of the Local Organising Committee (LOC) James McLean, emphasised the importance of having support and participation of eminent international Food Scientists and food organisation – IFT, IUFoST and ILSI, as this brought up the level of the congress and exhibition.
Known speakers from abroad as well as many African countries included well known South African food consultant Nigel Sunley, Malebogo Lekgoa from the Family and Consumer Sciences Department at the University of Botswana, amongst many others.
Students from all tertiary institutions also took part exhibiting various posters which covered a large spectrum of scientific research.
Jake Norman of the OAL Group in the United Kingdom , gave an insightful presentation on the collaborative research and development of a steam infusion system for the provision of healthier food
products using Zambia’s DairyGold as a case study.
SAAFoST is a National Association which is concerned with advancing the knowledge of Food Science and
Technology. This it does through encouraging scientific research, organising meetings, seminars, workshops, exhibitions, congresses, publishing papers and assisting in educational activities. Currently the Association has in the order of 2000 members throughout Southern Africa – the Cape, KwaZulu-Natal and Northern branches attend to the regional affairs of the Association. The national secretariat is situated in Durban.
SAAFoST Tel: +27 31 3688000; info@saafost.org.za; www.saafost.org.za



Agro Processing Africa Summit 2015

26th & 27th November 2015, Amabhubesi Training Centre, Ferndale, Randburg, Johannesburg
Africa’s dominant agricultural sector makes the continent a prime location for the establishment of agroprocessing industries. Processing of food adds value to agriculture and edible animal products by grading standardization, packing and preserving of produce so that products could be formed in such a way that they can be sold in market of the country and abroad. This is vital since it creates employment and helps in import substitution, foreign currency earnings from exports of processed products coming from agriculture, forestry and fisheries. African governments and the private sectors need to develop concerted efforts and strategies to support agro processing ventures since they convert raw materials into manufactured products and reduce the number of farmers practising at subsistence level. Agro processing in Africa is in the hands of the few conglomerates and this effectively closes doors for aspiring small holder farmers and small business to benefit from the earnings that agro processing has to offer. Agro processing can succeed if farmers and agro processors were able to access the requisite funding to embark on sustainable ventures. Investment, ICT, access to markets as well establishing and enabling environment also play a crucial role in making agro processing a success story. In many eveloping countries especially in sub-Saharan Africa, communities are largely rural and agriculture is often the sole source of household income. They earn low incomes and unemployment is high. Agro processing offers an opportunity to reduce hunger and fight poverty. South Africa is establishing Agri Parks across the country. They seek to link production areas to support communities, smallholder farmers and emerging black farmers.
Discover the various funding opportunities which are available for aspiring small enterprises and agro processing ventures.
Learn about the Agri Parks which the South African government is establishing in all the nine provinces in a bid to support communities, smallholder farmers and emerging black farmers. Network and mingle with funders, peers and decision makers in Southern Africa and even beyond. Identify and understand the factors which allow agricultural commodity value chains to grow and thrive. Learn about the challenges which face small holder farmers in their quest to market and process their produce. Learn valuable lessons from real life and successful case studies in East and Southern Africa on running viable cooperatives and community projects.
The summit seeks to explore ways in which such programs can be implemented sustainably and improve the standards of living of many who are struggling to make it.
Who Should Attend:
• Directors and branch managers for agricultural produce retailing
• Food processing companies
• Heads for retail finance
• Financiers and funding managers
• Commodity brokers
• Exporters and importers of agricultural produce,
• Private sector value chain or multi-stakeholder associations
• Farmer organizations and unions
Farming cooperatives members
• Commodity group dealers
• Civil society organizations actively involved in value chain work and policy makers.
The event will characterized by robust dialogue with leading experts around the challenges and opportunities for linking agriculture, processing and marketing.
Registration contact Micheal Chansa Tel: +27 11 326 0353; michael@amabhubesi.com



SABMiller rejects takeover bid

Market leader Anheuser-Busch InBev NV went public with a takeover proposal for SABMiller PLC that valued the company at up to $104 billion after winning over its biggest shareholder, but the world’s No. 2 brewer said the price was too low.
A combination of the two companies would create a beer behemoth with unrivaled scale and reach, bringing brands like Budweiser and Stella Artois, which have been languishing in key markets, into new corners of the globe.
The deal faces many hurdles, from likely antitrust scrutiny to tensions between SABMiller’s two largest shareholders, which together control 41% of the company.
U.S. tobacco group Altria Group Inc., the maker of Marlboro cigarettes, owns more than 25% of the brewer and has said it would support a deal at or above AB InBev’s proposed price of £42.15 ($64.2) a share—a 44% premium over SABMiller’s Sept. 14 closing price, the day media speculation about a potential takeover began to circulate.
But Altria’s three representatives on SABMiller’s 16-member board were the only ones not rejecting the proposal Wednesday, which the board said “still very substantially undervalues SABMiller, its unique and unmatched footprint, and its stand-alone prospects.” – The Wall Street Journal



Drought kills livestock

At least 12 cattle have succumbed to drought in Gwanda District with more expected to die due to drought in Matabeleland South province, officials said.
Geoffrey Hove, the Gwanda district acting livestock production and development officer told a Rural District Development Committee (RDDC) meeting that two donkeys had also died due to the drought.
“Manama has the highest number of cattle deaths recorded of which six cattle have succumbed to drought while Nhwali, Gungwe and Sibona areas have recorded two cattle deaths each. The situation is bad. Grazing conditions are now very poor especially in the communal areas. We’re likely to record more deaths because there’s so much outcry from the farmers regarding the current situation,” said Hove.
In 2012, the province lost more than 9 000 cattle as the effect of the drought took a toll.
In April this year, Paddy Zhanda, the Deputy Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development responsible for livestock, accompanied by officials from the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), visited the province to assess the drought situation.
“We’re really pleading with the Government to come to our rescue because livestock is the main source of our livelihoods. We’re trying by all means to save our livestock but it’s difficult,” said Cosmas Nyathi, a farmer from Manama.
Although the recorded cattle deaths are in Gwanda district so far, Beitbridge, Matobo, Bulilima, Insiza and Mangwe districts are likely to also start losing cattle.
More than 350 000 cattle are at risk of succumbing to drought in Matabeleland South if no intervention measures are put in place to save the livestock in this cattle ranching region. – The Herald



Kelloggs acquires Mass Food Group

Kellogg Company (Kellogg) has acquired Egypt’s largest cereal producing company, Mass Food Group, for about US$50mn. The acquisition is a part of Kellogg’s growth strategy for emerging markets. Calling Mass Food Group an excellent strategic fit for Kellogg, Chris Hood, president of Kellogg Europe, said, “The combination of Mass Food Group’s manufacturing capabilities, established local brands, and sales and distribution infrastructure, coupled with Kellogg’s product innovation, international sales knowledge, iconic brands and marketing expertise, will help unlock the growth potential of the cereal category in the key markets of Egypt and North Africa.”
Other than the payment of US$50mn, the American food giant will also repay the debts that are on the books of Mass Food Group. The Egyptian company’s chairman, Alaa al-Bahey said that the future management of the company, which was a family business till now, will involve the Bahey family.
Speaking about how the company will benefit from its association with Kellogg, Tamer El Bahay, V-P of Mass Food Group, said, “With their know-how and expertise, we can emerge stronger together with a combined portfolio of brands to excite our consumers.”
Mass Food Group began as a family business in 1996 and has grown into an US$18mn business, in terms of sales. The company has more than 600 employees and exports its products to more than 30 markets in Europe, East Asia and Africa. Earlier in 2015, Kellogg had acquired another Egyptian company, Bisco Misr, which manufactures packaged biscuits. Kellogg had recently entered a joint venture with Tolaram Africa to develop snacks and breakfast foods for the West African market, as well as noodles across Africa. “Today’s announcement builds upon significant progress against our emerging market growth strategy announced earlier this year,” said John Bryant, CEO of Kellogg Company. – Africafarming.net



SADC Water Dialogue opens up new channels

The 7th SADC Multi-stakeholder Water Dialogue recently was held in Windhoek, Namibia from 29-30 September 2015.
Theo Diergaarat, Namibia’s deputy minister for agriculture, water and forestry, called the SADC roadmap and strategy for the region a major milestone which will accelerate economic growth in the region, and also diversify and broaden the manufacturing and industrial bases.
The stakeholder dialogue is a joint organisational collaboration between the SADC Secretariat and the Global Water Partnership Southern Africa (GWP-SA), operating under the theme of ‘Watering development in SADC: The central role of water in driving industrialisation’.
“Water cuts across all sectors of our economy and is not a one-man business as it requires all sectors to work together in a nexus approach. We acknowledge the efforts made by GWP-SA together with the SADC Secretariat’s water division who singled out Namibia to be the host for the water dialogue,” Diergaarat said.
Assistance for the conference has also been received from the Desert Research Foundation of Namibia, which acted as the secretariat for Namibia Water Partnership, and support staff from the Namibian Agriculture Ministry, according to Diergaarat.
Diergaarat added that Namibia, like most African water-scarce countries, is looking to take advantage of cooperation in international shared water resources in order to maximise the benefits for industrial development.
The multi-stakeholder water dialogue is a bi-annual activity which originated through the Integrated Water Resources Management awareness creation programme. – Africanfarming.net



Agro Processing Africa Summit 2015

26th & 27th November 2015; Amabhubesi Training Centre, Ferndale, Randburg, Johannesburg

Africa’s dominant agricultural sector makes the continent a prime location for the establishment of agroprocessing industries. Processing of food adds value to agriculture and edible animal products by grading standardization, packing and preserving of produce so that products could be formed in such a way that they can be sold in market of the country and abroad. This is vital since it creates employment and helps in import substitution, foreign currency earnings from exports of processed products coming from agriculture, forestry and fisheries. African governments and the private sectors need to develop concerted efforts and strategies to support agro processing ventures since they convert raw materials into manufactured products and reduce the number of farmers practising at subsistence level. Agro processing in Africa is in the hands of the few conglomerates and this effectively closes doors for aspiring small holder farmers and small business to benefit from the earnings that agro processing has to offer. Agro processing can succeed if farmers and agro processors were able to access the requisite funding to embark on sustainable ventures. Investment, ICT, access to markets as well establishing and enabling environment also play a crucial role in making agro processing a success story. In many developing countries especially in sub-Saharan Africa, communities are largely rural and agriculture is often the sole source of household income. They earn low incomes and unemployment is high. Agro processing offers an opportunity to reduce hunger and fight poverty. South Africa is establishing
Agri Parks across the country. They seek to link production areas to support communities, smallholder farmers and emerging black farmers.
Discover the various funding opportunities which are available for aspiring small enterprises and agro processing ventures. Learn about the Agri Parks which the South African government is establishing in all the nine provinces in a bid to support communities, smallholder farmers and emerging black farmers. Network and mingle with funders, peers and decision makers in Southern Africa and even beyond. Identify and understand the factors which allow agricultural commodity value chains to grow and thrive. Learn about the challenges which face small holder farmers in their quest to market and process their produce. Learn valuable lessons from real life and successful case studies in East and Southern Africa on running viable cooperatives and community projects.
The summit seeks to explore ways in which such programs can be implemented sustainably and improve the standards of living of many who are struggling to make it.
Who Should Attend:
Directors and branch managers for agricultural produce retailing
Food processing companies
Heads for retail finance
Financiers and funding managers
Commodity brokers
Exporters and importers of agricultural produce,
Private sector value chain or multi-stakeholder associations
Farmer organizations and unions
Farming cooperatives members
Commodity group dealers
Civil society organizations actively involved in value chain work and policy makers.

The event will characterized by robust dialogue with leading experts around the challenges and opportunities for linking agriculture, processing and marketing.
Registration contact Micheal Chansa Tel: +27 11 326 0353; michael@amabhubesi.com



DRDLR awards R235m to emerging farmers

THE Department of Rural Development and Land Reform (DRDLR) approved R235 million for emerging farmers to acquire land to ease congestion in communal and state land across five provinces and boost food security. This is according to the department’s acting chief director:strategic communication, Sivuyile Mangxamba. He says the DRDLR spent an additional R69 million for farm recapitalisation.
According to his statement an estimated 145 permanent jobs are expected to be created from the 13 projects, with an additional 1 114 temporary jobs. Mangxamba says a total of 41 252 hectares were acquired in five provinces across the country under the Proactive Land Acquisition Strategy (PLAS).
The PLAS seeks to acquire strategically-located land for redistribution to emerging farmers.
The acquisition approved will contribute towards achieving the development goals espoused in the National Development Plan. The department acquires farms through the PLAS. The acquisitions approved will contribute towards achieving the development goals as espoused in the National Development Plan.
According to the minister of Rural Development and Land Reform, Gugile Nkwinti, this will go a long way towards fast-tracking service delivery in rural areas.
The applications indicated that most emerging farmers wanted to pursue livestock farming, crops, vegetables, game and poultry.
Funding applications were also used to purchase machinery, trucks, bulls, pregnant heifers and pack houses among others. – News24



CAMC gives Zimbabwean agriculture a lifeline

China CAMC Engineering has announced plans to revive operations at Arda Mushumbi Pools Estate with a US$200mn investment. According to reports, the estate in Mashonaland Central region will get the money over the next five years, and the funding will be used to develop irrigation. The Chinese company had sealed a deal with Zimbabwe’s Agricultural Rural Development Authority (ARDA) to resuscitate the estate, but the deal is subject to approval by the country’s government through the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development.
Wang Kailong, country representative for Zimbabwe at China CAMC Engineering, said that his company was committed to helping the revival of agriculture in Zimbabwe, and that it had wanted to build a dam at Arda Mushumbi Pools that would irrigate about 1,000 ha.
He added that China CAMC Engineering would also set up a cotton ginnery and a fruit canning plant at Mushumbi. “We have already signed a contract with ARDA for us to build a dam, a cotton ginnery and a fruit canning plant at Mushumbi Pools,” he added. “The dam that we intend to build will also have the capacity to generate about 15MW of electricity that will provide power to the ginnery and canning plant that we want to set up at Mushumbi Pools.” Kailong added that the company is sourcing money for the project from Chinese banks. China CAMC Engineering has already supplied Zimbabwe with agricultural machinery such as tractors, combine harvesters and other implements worth about US$58mn since 2002.— www.africanfarming.net



Massey Ferguson launches two new combines for 2016 – South Africa

Massey Ferguson, an AGCO brand, has announced MF Activa 7340 and MF Activa 7344 combines for the 2016 season.
The new five straw-walker, MF Activa 7340 combine replaces the MF Activa 7240 and is an entry-level machine powered by a 176 horsepower, AGCO Power 4.9 litre, four cylinder engine.
Highlighting the benefits of the new four cylinder combine, Adam Sherriff, marketing manager at Massey Ferguson, said, “It has been a long time since a combine has been powered by a four cylinder engine. This offers the operating benefits of a six cylinder, but in a lighter, smaller package. Fewer moving parts reduce friction leading to lower fuel consumption with quieter operation.”
With the engine comes a new CANbus linked control panel in the cab whose colour screen shows a range
of engine and combine operating information. The cab also has a new multifunction lever, similar to that used on larger Massey Ferguson combines, that provides convenient control of all the commonly-used combine functions.
Depending on the width of the crop being harvested, a new ‘sectional’ concave can be changed through the stone trap without needing to remove the elevator.
The concave also has independent front and rear adjustment options to improve threshing performance.
The new MF Activa 7344, which replaces the MF Activa 7244, is now available with the option of a 5.5 metres wide PowerFlow header. “PowerFlow is proven to boost output by up to 73% in oilseed rape, 15% in wheat and 12% in barley. It is also particularly useful in difficult conditions, helping farmers secure more of their harvest, more quickly,” explained Sherriff.
AGCO is a global leader in the design, manufacture and distribution of agricultural equipment.
Massey is available in South Africa and a few other African countries
– www.Africanfarming.net



Burera livestock farmers upbeat over new milk plant – Rwanda

Livestock keepers in Burera district, Rwanda, are upbeat as a new milk factorynears completion. According to officials in the region the factory is owned by Burera Dairy Ltd and is being constructed by the Ministry of Trade and Industry through Business Development Fund at a cost of Rwf 700m (US$ 961 828).
The factory is expected to produce cheese, yoghurt and butter, among other products. The project is one of the small and medium industry promotions being undertaken by the Trade Ministry to promote value addition across the country. Locals welcomed the factory, saying it offers timely answers to farmers who have previously complained about lack of market for their milk.
Gedeon Cyambaza, president of Burera Diary Company board, added that the factory will add more value to milk production and that farmers will now be able to sell their milk at collection centres from where it will be picked for processing.
Said Gedeon; “Once the factory is operational it will provide a ready market to farmers and area residents will be able to get other milk products close to them.”
– www.allafrica.com



Anchor joins Ethiopian dairy market – Ethiopia

Anchor, New Zealand’s leading milk brand, has begun producing fortified milk drink in Ethiopia. The company launched its first nationwide Anchor fortified milk drink earlier this month.
According to State industry Minister Dr Mebratu Meles, enabling Anchor fortified milk drink to begin production as the first-ever milk powder dry blending plant in Ethiopia would play a significant role in the national goal of ending child malnutrition by 2030. He said: “The beginning of Anchor milk production in Ethiopia will add great impetus to the nation’s vision of transforming the agriculture led economy to an industry led one in the shortest time possible. The government of Ethiopia has been formulating and adopting various policies and strategies aimed at attracting local and foreign investors who wish to get involved in such agroprocessing industries. Moreover, the government has established Ethiopian Meat and Dairy Industry Development Institute in a bid to exploit the country’s potentials in this regard.”
New Zealand Milk Products General Manager for Ethiopia, Zeco Kassim, said that one glass of Anchor’s Fortified Milk Drink contains more than 30 nutrients essential for a child’s growth and development, including protein, calcium, vitamins A and D, iron and zinc.
New Zealand Milk Products Ethiopia is a joint venture between local partner Faffa Foods and New Zealand Dairy Cooperative Fonterra, which is the world’s largest dairy exporter.– The Herald Ethiopi